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  • Designing homegarden agroforest, Hawaii
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Maui workshop June 12-13, 2015

Creative-Agroforestry-Workshop-logo-360px"Creative agroforestry for food production in home, farm, and community landscapes"

The art of agroforestry is experiencing a renaissance in Hawai‘i due to our newfound passion for eating local food that is grown sustainably. Drawing upon the long traditions of agroforestry in the Pacific, a new workshop, “Creative Agroforestry for Food Production in Home, Farm, and Community Landscapes” will be presented on Maui June 12-13 (also Kona June 20-21 and O’ahu June 27-28). The workshop brings together agroforestry expertise from around Hawai‘i to offer participants an introduction to best practices in agroforestry or enhance their skills in establishing and maintaining a custom-designed agroforestry landscape. 

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Dr. Harley Manner, a pioneer of agroforestry science in the Pacific Islands, will summarize his 40 years of experience of sustainable agricultural systems in the Pacific. Craig Elevitch of Agroforestry Net will present Pacific Island agroforestry landscapes as models for abundant, low-input food systems. Seth Raabe of Mahele Farm will discuss his experiences utilizing disturbance and local resources in tropical agroforestry. Natural methods for establishing and maintaining food-producing agroforestry landscapes will be presented by Tom Baldwin. How risks of pests and diseases can be reduced in diverse agricultural systems will be presented by Dr. Hector Valenzuela of UH Manoa. Dr. Amjad Ahmad, also from UH Manoa, will present recent research about how locally available materials can enhance soil function, thereby replacing imported soil inputs. Finally, Ranae Ganske-Cerizo of the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service will explain federal assistance programs that can be used in association with planning and implementing agroforestry systems. 

Field tours on the second day of the workshop will highlight production agroforestry on a working farm, pioneering and succession strategies, a diverse fruit orchard, and agroforestry regeneration of degraded land. The workshop is recommended for landscapers, nursery growers, agricultural professionals, farmers, ranchers, homeowners, agricultural extension, community planners, and community development organizers. The workshop is sponsored by Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education and organized by Sustainable Living Institute of Maui in collaboration with Hawaii Homegrown Food Network. 

Recommended participants: Everyone interested in sustainable food-producing landscapes: Farmers, ranchers, and homeowners, landscapers, agricultural professionals, agricultural extension, community planners, and everyone working with agriculture, urban beautification, conservation, and human nutrition.

Agroforestry-Landscapes-cover-200pxRegistration: Early registration is $75 by Saturday, June 6, and $100 thereafter. Please register early, as space is limited.

A local vegetarian lunch will be provided on Friday, June 12. Participants will receive a copy of the new 320-page book Agroforestry Landscapes for Pacific Islands: Creating abundant and resilient food systems by Craig Elevitch (a $60 value).

Register for the workshop through EventBrite

REGISTER for the MAUI workshop 

MAUI workshop agenda (subject to adjustments)

Friday 6/12/2015 Maui Community College  
9:00 (sharp)-9:15 Michael Howden, PermacultureMaui Opening pule and welcome
9:15-9:45 TBA Cultural roots of Hawaiian agroforestry
9:45-10:15 Harley Manner, University of Guam (retired) Sustainable agricultural systems in the Pacific Islands
10:15-10:45 Craig Elevitch, Agroforestry Net Reconnecting to Pacific Island agroforestry landscapes
10:45-11:00 --- Break
11-11:30 Hector Valenzuela, UH CTAHR Pest and disease prevention in agroforestry
11:30-12:00 Tom Baldwin, Uluwehi Farm Bountiful agroforestry landscapes using natural methods
12:00-1:00 --- Lunch by Carrie
1:00-1:30 Amjad Ahmad, UH CTAHR Local sources of soil fertility
1:30-2:00 Seth Raabe, manager, Mahele Farm Utilizing disturbance and local resources in tropical agroforestry
2:00-2:30 Craig Elevitch, Agroforestry Net Modern agroforestry practices for increased yields and lower risks
2:30-3:00 Ranae Ganske-Cerizo, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Agroforestry Assistance through USDA NRCS
3:00-3:10 Jenny Pell, Maui Permaculture Guild Permaculture visions
3:10-4:15 All Breakout Session with all presenters
4:15-4:30 Melanie Stephens Preparation for tomorrow’s field tours
     
Saturday 6/13/2015 Field tours Bring sun/rain gear, brown bag lunch, snacks, drinking water, mosquito repellent
9:00 (sharp) Jayanti Nand Eat Me Orchard, Wailuku
10:00-10:45 --- Travel between Wailuku and Kula
11:00-12:00 Gerry Ross Kupa'a Farms, Kula
12-12:30 --- Lunch/Travel to Makawao
12:30-1:30 Tom Baldwin Ulua Palms, Makawao
1:30-1:45 --- Travel to Haiku
1:45-3:00 Francis Spalluto Haiku 'Aina Permaculture Initiative, Haiku

Sponsors

The workshops are presented by Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and Agroforestry Net with sponsorship of the USDA Western Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program in collaboration with Sustainable Living Institute of Maui and Maui Community College. 

 SLIM-logo-360pxSARE Western logoHHFN logo-72px 

 

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The 2-day "Creative Agroforestry for Home, Farm, and Community Landscapes" workshop was held at Anaina Hou Community Park on April 25-26, 2015. Fifty-five participants attended the lively workshop, which consisted of a series of presentations by eight presenters, followed by a day of field tours of agroforestry sites in the Kilauea area. Participants included landscapers, agricultural professionals, agricultural extension, community planners, farmers, ranchers, and homeowners.

The workshop began by honoring the wisdom and traditions of native Hawaiians, as expressed through agroforestry practices and ecological stewardship. The Hawaiian experience was placed within the larger context of Pacific islander agroforestry, each culture with its distinctive mix of species, yet repeating a consistent theme. Principles of integrated pest management and its application in agroforestry systems was explored. The University of Hawai’i’s ongoing research into cost-effective organic soil amendments with recommendations on their use was also covered. A primer was offered on proper planting, establishment, and pruning of fruit trees. Livestock can be a valuable addition to agroforestry systems, and some of the most popular choices for Hawai'i were presented. How we plan for, implement, and perpetuate agroforestry landscapes in private and public spaces is essential to their success, and example stories and suggestions were given. Discussion circles, led by the workshop presenters, allowed participants to explore their area of interest further. Visits to three contrasting field sites revealed the challenges and opportunities inherent to working agroforestry systems.

Continue Reading

publication about food-producing landscapes: AGROFORESTRY LANDSCAPES FOR PACIFIC ISLANDS

Agroforestry-Landscapes-cover-200pxThis publication focuses on low-input, self-sufficient, and sustainable techniques for growing food in the Pacific. The chapters cover a range of time-tested traditional agroforestry systems, modern agroforestry systems, local sources of soil fertility, pest and disease control, livestock, and getting started with planning and implementation. 

Download the chapters below or purchase the book Agroforestry Landscapes for Pacific Islands at Amazon.com

Sustainable-Pacific-Systems-cover-160pxSustainable Traditional Agricultural Systems of the Pacific Islands by Harley I. Manner. Covers key patterns in traditional Pacific agroforestry systems and presents example agroforestry systems that could be adapted in modern day. Locally Available Resources Radovich-cover-160pxEnhancing Soil Function and Plant Health with Locally Available Resources by Ted Radovich, Archana Pant, Amjad Ahmad, Craig Elevitch, and Nguyen Hue. Focuses on the use of locally available resources to enhance soil function and plant health in the short and long term. The emphasis is on a description of the inputs, pros and cons of use, specific conditions in Hawai‘i and recommendations for food producers.
Sustainable Pest and Disease Control-cover-160pxPest and Disease Control Strategies for Sustainable Pacific Agroecosystems by Hector Valenzuela. Covers recommended production practices that may be used in agroforestry systems of the Pacific and tropical regions to create resilient production systems and enhance and protect the natural resources on the farm. Livestock in Agroforestry Fukumoto-cover-160pxSmall-scale Livestock Production in Agroforestry Landscapes by Glen Fukumoto. Covers integration of livestock into Pacific Island environments, including local fodder and sustainable waste management. 
Growers Guide Pacific Agroforestry Elevitch-cover-160pxGrower’s Guide to Pacific Island Agroforestry Systems: Information Resources, and Public Assistance Programs by Craig Elevitch, Garien Behling, Michael Constantinides, and James B. Friday. Describes ten of the most important agroforestry systems of the Pacific Islands and associated practices supported by technical and financial assistance programs through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and other state and federal programs. Includes a resources section (technical guides, periodicals, organizations, and species information). Getting Started Agroforestry Elevitch-cover-160pxGetting Started with Food-producing Agroforestry Landscapes in the Pacific by Craig Elevitch. Introduces Pacific agroforestry systems in general, and presents the benefits of these systems compared with monocultures and ornamental landscapes. Covers water issues, soil fertility, selecting an agroforestry system, establishment, maintenance, species selection, crops and example systems, and recommended resources. 

Food-producing-cover"Benefits of perennial edible landscapes: A primer for agricultural professionals" How can we address common obstacles to home grown food? What are the benefits of food-producing perennial landscapes? How can people grow food in their home landscapes without increasing their costs? This primer addresses these questions and offers guidance for promoting food-producing landscapes.

Policy-Brief-cover"Food-producing agroforestry landscapes for Pacific Islands: A policy brief" summarizes the main conclusions of this project for policy makers.

AGROFORESTRY FOR FOOD SECURITY AND HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS

There is a growing movement towards the use of perennial food plants in private and public landscapes. This project took place 2011-2015, bringing together expertise from throughout Hawai'i to train professionals in food-producing agroforestry landscapes.

The project resulted in a book that is available for free download (see below). Also, five workshops took place throughout Hawai'i during the first half of 2015 and many of the presentations and some photos are available for download

PROJECT SPONSORS

This project is a collaboration of Agroforestry Net and Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network with sponsorship of the Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program.

SARE Western logoHHFN logo-72px Agroforestry.ORG-logo-200px

Workshops

Creative agroforestry for food production in home, farm, and community landscapes

Creative-Agroforestry-Workshop-logo-360px

Agroforestry landscapes are models of productive, low input systems that have sustained people for centuries in Hawai'i. Farmers, homeowners, and communities are rediscovering the many benefits of agroforestry. This workshop gave participants an introduction to best practices in establishing and maintaining a working agroforestry landscape tailored to their needs. Presentations combined traditional, modern, and local knowledge to enable participants to get started on their own systems, avoiding pitfalls. The workshops took place in 2015 on Moloka'i (March 21), Kaua'i (April 25-26), Maui (June 12-13), Kona (June 20-21), and O’ahu (June 27-28). Over 240 attendees and 30 presenters participated in the five workshops. A selection of workshop photos and presentations is below.

Topics included:

  • Important Pacific island crops and agroforestry practices
  • Enhancing soil function using locally available resources
  • Pest and disease prevention strategies
  • Food forestry for home and commercial use
  • Advice and techniques for landscapers
  • Hawaiian cultural perspective on Pacific Island agroforestry 
  • Strategies for converting to agroforestry systems
  • USDA NRCS assistance programs that support agroforestry practices
  • Integrating livestock and poultry
  • Local experiences in agroforestry system implementation

Workshop presentations

Amjad Ahmad, UH CTAHR Local sources of soil fertility Molokai, Kauai, Maui, Kona
Tom Baldwin, Uluwehi Farm Bountiful agroforestry landscapes using natural methods Maui, Kona
Colleen Carroll and Talia Abrams Encouraging more food-producing landscapes Kauai
Bino Castelo, Botanical Manager, Kaua‘i Mini Golf Cultural dimensions of Pacific Island agroforests Kauai
Michael Constantinides, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Agroforestry Assistance through NRCS Oahu
Craig Elevitch, Agroforestry Net Reconnecting to Pacific Island agroforestry landscapes Molokai, Kauai, Maui, Kona, Oahu
Craig Elevitch, Agroforestry Net Modern agroforestry practices for increased yields and lower risks Molokai, Kauai, Maui, Kona, Oahu
Glen Fukumoto, UH CTAHR Small-scale Livestock Production in Agroforestry Landscapes Oahu
Ranae Ganske-Cerizo, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Agroforestry Assistance through USDA NRCS Maui
Uncle Sol Kahoʻohalahala Cultural roots of Hawaiian agriculture Maui
Natalie Kurashima, Department of Botany, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Traditional Hawaiian agriculture systems of Kona  Kona
Neil Logan, FARM Center From pasture to perennial food forest Kona
Matt Lynch, Asia-Pacific Center for Regenerative Design Restoring and Regenerating Agricultural Ecosystems Oahu
Harley Manner, University of Guam (retired) Sustainable agricultural systems in the Pacific Islands Maui
Sara Moore, Livestock specialist with Farmworks Hawaii Integrating livestock with tree crops Kona
Laura Nelson, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Agroforestry Assistance through USDA NRCS Kona
Seth Raabe, manager, Mahele Farm Utilizing disturbance and local resources in tropical agroforestry Maui
Ted Radovich, UH CTAHR Local sources of soil fertility Oahu
Milan Rupert, Nursery Manager Kaua‘i Nursery & Landscaping Installation and maintenance of food landscapes Kauai
Matt Stevenson, USDA NRCS Small-scale Livestock Production in Agroforestry Landscapes Kauai
Hector Valenzuela, UH CTAHR Pest and disease prevention in agroforestry Kauai, Maui, Kona, Oahu

Workshop sponsors

The "Creative agroforestry for food production in home, farm, and community landscapes" workshops were presented as a collaboration of Agroforestry Net and Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network with sponsorship of the USDA Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program in collaboration with local partners.

 SARE Western logoHHFN logo-72px Agroforestry.ORG-logo-200px

RIBG-logo-small   ACHP-horizontal-logo   KFF-logo-Gothic-821-small

SLIM-logo-360px       AGG logo pms-hi-contrast  

Contact information

Craig Elevitch
Agroforestry Net
PO Box 428
Holualoa, Hawaii 96725 USA
E-mail: craig@agroforestry.net

 

 

 

 

Can I start at any time of the year?

Our internship program is ongoing. We usually have only one intern at any given time, and at certain times of year we cannot accommodate any interns. If you feel this program is right for you, it is best to apply well in advance of your desired time period to ensure that there is an opening for you.

Are there any fees?

There is a $250 reservation fee to be paid in advance in order to hold your place. Once your place is reserved, cancellations up to 60 days before your internship start date and receive a refund minus a $100 cancellation fee. For cancellations within 60 days of your internship start date, there is no reservation fee refund. Upon successful completion of the internship, the $250 reservation fee is refunded. Interns cover the costs of their food (aside from what is available from our farm), personal items, and all travel costs to/from Kona. There is no cost for staying on our farm during your internship.

Is this program only for U.S. citizens and permanent residents?

We welcome program participants from anywhere in the world. However, upon arrival you must show us your legal U.S. immigration documentation valid for the entire 8-week period of your internship.

Who will supervise me?

You will work closely with Craig Elevitch, Director of Agroforestry Net, a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to education and research in agroforestry and ecological resource management. The organization's internationally recognized publications have guided thousands of readers in becoming more proficient in ecological food production, agroforestry, and reforestation. Craig edits The Overstory E-journal, a monthly agroforestry journal with 8,700 subscribers in over 185 countries. He has coordinated numerous workshops and field days for Pacific island agroforestry, with over 3,000 farmers and resource professionals participating since 1993. Craig completed the permaculture certified basic and advanced training taught by Max Lindegger and Lea Harrison in 1990-91, and has authored many agroforestry books as well as over 75 permaculture and forest stewardship management plans throughout Hawai'i. You can expect an hour or two a day working and/or meeting with Craig.

How much of my time will the internship take?

We expect you to devote yourself entirely to the internship, which includes farm and garden work, the study project, educational activities, and other related work and projects. You are also expected to participate in general household activities such as food harvesting, preparation, clean-up, etc. This is not a "9-to-5" experience, rather, it requires flexibility and willingness to do whatever it takes to get the job done. We are looking for people who will make the most out of their experience.

Can I complete an internship in less than 8 weeks?

Only in special cases (extensive tropical agroforestry experience and ample experience producing extension-level educational materials) would we consider an internship period of less than 8 weeks.

Will there be an orientation?

There is a two week no-fault trial period during which time you will be able to get a feeling for our farm, projects, and working environment and we will get a sense for how well we work together.

How long will it take for you to respond to e-mail questions?

Before writing us, please read this web page and scan the contents of Agroforestry.net to learn more about our activities. Questions that are specific and require brief answers are more likely to be answered quickly.

 

Audience for Craig Elevitch's presentation about traditional agroforestry homegardens, which took place at the Kona Outdoor Circle, in Kona, Hawaii.

This project was sponsored by:

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Conservation Innovation Grant program and the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research and Development in partnership with the Big Island Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D) Council, with matching contributions from the project collaborators’ organizations.

  • The Big Island RC&D Council is a 501c3 non-profit corporation registered in the State of Hawai‘i.
  • The RC&D Program is a public-private partnership administered by NRCS that assists individuals and organizations with grant acquisition and fiscal management for beneficial community projects.

 

USDA NRCS logo
WSARE logo County of Hawaii
Dept. of Research and Development
PAR logo agroforestry.net logo